Three Mile Island Meltdown – SJ Environmental Justice

On March 28, 1979, Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, PA was running at about 100 % power when it immediately turned off after a pump that supplied cooling water quit running. Pressure and temperature level increased in the activator, creating a pressure safety valve to open. The safety valve opened as it was supposed to, and water and steam began draining from the reactor to a tank in the basement of the reactor building.

As the pressure returned to normal, the shutoff valve should have closed. However, unbeknown to the plant operators, the shutoff valve stayed open. It continued to be open for more than two hours, permitting water that covered and cooled the fuel core to leave from the reactor system, causing the fuel to overheat.

Nonetheless, instrumentation in the TMI control room showed to the plant operators that the valve was shut and that too much water was being infused into the reactor vessel. Therefore, plant operators didn’t replace the water that was shed as a result of the open valve.

As the pressure continued to go down, an increasing number of coolant turned to vapor, causing too much vibrating in the main coolant pumps. The vibration made the plant operators at Three Mile Island, who didn’t recognize the reactor was suffering a loss of coolant, to close the pumps.

The reduction of pressure and water caused a big steam bubble to form in the top of the reactor vessel, preventing the flow of cooling water through the core. Without coolant, core temperatures increased above the melting point of the fuel cladding and the uranium fuel.

50% of the fuel melted before the flow of coolant was restored. Likewise, the cold cooling water shattered several of the hot fuel rods. All of the fuel was destroyed. As a result, over 600,000 gallons of radioactive cooling water went into the basement of the reactor building and storage tanks in the auxiliary building, infecting them.

Furthermore, a small amount of radioactive material was launched right into the atmosphere from the ventilation stack of the auxiliary building to ease pressure inside the reactor building.

Health Effects

The TMI accident created no injuries, and at the very least, a dozen epidemiological research studies performed since 1981 have actually found no noticeable direct health effects to impact to the populated area around the plant.

In 2003, a federal court dismissed the case of 2,000 plaintiffs seeking damages from the former plant owners. The court claimed the plaintiffs had actually failed to present evidence they had obtained a radiation dosage big sufficient to cause possible health and wellness effects.

Years of research study and clinical studies have actually shown no unfavorable health issues to the residents around the plant. People that suffered economic losses as a result of the evacuation after the incident were paid quickly, validating the performance of the industry’s obligation insurance coverage protection under the Price-Anderson Act. On top of that, companies were compensated for loss of revenue, and the state and local communities were compensated for costs accrued from responding to the accident.

Safety Measures

Two weeks after the 1979 Three Mile Island accident, President Jimmy Carter assigned a 12-member commission, headed by the late John Kemeny, who was then the president of Dartmouth College, to explore exactly what had taken place and the possible influence it would have on the health and wellness of the public and plant personnel.

The Kemeny Compensation provided a report in October 1979, recommended that the industry creates its own criteria for excellence. The commission also pointed out a need for agency-accredited training institutions for nuclear plant operators and operation supervisors.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also moved promptly, setting up a group to research the accident. Attorney Mitchell Rogovin headed the team, and its conclusions coincided with those of the Kemeny Commission.

In 1979, the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) was due to the failure of equipment and the inability of the plant operators to understand the condition of the nuclear reactors. A slow reduction of cooling water to the reactor’s heat-producing core caused a part of the fuel rod cladding and uranium fuel, as well as the release of a minimal amount of radioactive material.

The TMI accident caused no injuries or fatalities. On top of that, experts wrapped up that the quantity of radiation launched right into the environment was too tiny to result in noticeable direct impacts to the residents living around the plant. At the very least, numerous epidemiological studies have backed up this fact.  Both the industry and the federal government responded swiftly and also emphatically to the accident at Three Mile Island. As for more course of action, the industry formed the Institute of Nuclear Power Workflow (INPO) to ensure excellence in training, plant management, and operations.

Greensboro, GA Ecological Disaster – SJ Environmental Justice

picture: watchdog.org
In Greensboro, Georgia, a group of specialists, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), hit a water main while rating a hazardous 19th-century cotton mill site. The sediment sent harmful chemicals down to Lake Oconee and next to the Oconee River. The EPA had actually denied, but later admitted, that it moneyed the clean-up and also development task that triggered the disaster.

Though that accident happened in the earlier months of 2015, heavy rains that come into the Greensboro, GA area simply continue to send more dirt into the creek. Up until this time, the EPA has actually been able to avoid any major criticism for this harmful waste spill, even though it is still reeling from the disaster it produced at a Colorado gold mine.

Lead in the soil at the job site is 20,000 times above federal levels set up for drinking water, claimed microbiologist Dave Lewis, who was a top-level scientist during his 31 years at the EPA. He ended up being a whistleblower, critical of EPA techniques. Now Lewis works for Focus for Health, a non-profit that looks into disease triggers.

The goal of the EPA project was to create low-income housing. A grant was released around 2005 to turn the mill, as well as the surrounding grounds, into housing for the homeless and mentally ill. Professionals dealing with the Georgia Environmental management Division (GEPD) had begun excavating and tearing down the buildings– regardless of objections by the city of Greensboro and not having a solid plan on how to handle the hazardous waste.

The mill site has 34 dangerous chemicals, 30 of which are on the EPA’s checklist of top priority contaminants because of “high toxicity, perseverance, inadequate of degradability, and also damaging effects on living organisms,” Lewis created.

The Mill

The four-acre site contains the deserted Mary Leila Cotton Mill, which created sheeting until the early part of 2000. This hardwood floor structure, which was over 130,000 square feet, was covered in flaky, lead-based paint. This hazardous paint engulfed the grounds, along with ash produced by its coal-burning generators. High degrees of cancer-causing chemicals, such as benzopyrene, are also concealed there. Moreover, neighboring farmers discarded chemicals in the deserted area at a time when arsenic was utilized to kill insects.

Official documents, evaluated by a number of environmental groups, reveal proposals to move the dirt to other areas or cover it with concrete. The government agencies promised to keep track of and repair any potholes or cracks. But according to Lewis, any excavation would certainly send out big amounts of poisonous dirt right into the creek.

In spite of the man-made contaminants, the ground has actually held its own against more degradation. The hazardous soil was mainly constrained to densely-packed reduced levels held in check by a clay barrier. EPA/GEPD contractors destroyed that barrier with a backhoe. According to Lewis, this is what caused pollutants to flow freely.

The EPA hasn’t responded to any requests for comment. The firm has given clashing statements regarding its participation in the project, going from being familiar with absolutely nothing and then finally admitting that it paid for the cleanup and expansion through a grant.

Even Lewis claimed his previous employer (EPA), never ever revealed any kind of concern in a number of responses to his ongoing pleas regarding environmental problems around the old mill. In letters to Lewis and David Kopp, who represented the citizens in their litigation, the EPA downplayed poisoning the Greensboro, GA area creek, pointing to low levels collected in 2010 samples taken.

Lewis says he examined his very own examples at the College of Georgia, where he use to work as a marine biologist. The findings startled him. However, when he informed the EPA, it claimed it wasn’t aware of the situation at the mill.

“There is no government agency involved with any project at the mill property,” EPA Regional Supervisor Heather McTeer Toney wrote Lewis on Jan. 9. Five months later, in a May 28 letter to Lewis, Toney confessed the program was an “EPA brownfields grant-funded job” and that “remediation was needed to be carried out in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.” The state directed the developer to preserve the mill property in a fashion that protects people from exposure to unsafe contaminants, while the property is undergoing corrective action.

The EPA’s site claims brownfields jobs are part of the firm’s requirement in making environmental justice an integral part of every program and policy by applying EPA’s regulatory tools to safeguard at-risk areas.

November 2015 – SJ Environmental Justice

On December 5, 1952, the world’s romance with London’s fog ended in disaster. The real extent of wich was never being acknowledged. Air pollutants from the use of coal, combined with an anticyclone, windless condition and cold weather, formed a thin layer of smog over the city of London.

Cold weather for London’s residents meant the increasing need to burn more coal then usual to keep warm in houses. The coal people were using was an inferior quality as the government focused on exporting the good quality coal to pay off his depth. The low-grade coal increased the sulphur dioxide in the smoke that added to the coal-fired power station in London increased the level of pollution.

The anticyclone settled over London one day before the disaster and caused a temperature inversion, the cold air being trapped under a layer of warm air.This has resulted in a dense fog wich mixed with the chimney smoke, vehicle exhausts and other pollutants filled with sulphur, formed a persistent smog. Also, the absence of the wind prevented the smog to be dispersed.

At the time of the event, it wasn’t considered a significant event, even if it caused major disruption due to the effect of visibility. Continue reading The Great Smog of 1952

In August 1945, after four years of World War II, United States B-29 bomber, dropped the atomic bomb over the cities of Hiroshima on August 6th, 1946.

70.000  people died in 9 seconds, and the city of Hiroshima was leveled. 3 days later a second bomb was dropped  Nagasaki, Japan with the same devastating results. The bombing killed over 129.000 people.

This is the only use of a nuclear weapon in the history, and the justification of the bombing is still debated. It was the most devastating bomb that humanity invented

The bomb released a cataclastic load of energy. Death was instant. The ones who were close enough to see the blast lost their eyes. It was the last thing they ever saw.The bright light of the blast blinded them. The black of their eyes, the retina, melted away. The radiation received by the body is equivalent of today’s thousands of X-rays. The human body can’t absorb unlimited radiation. It falls apart because the cells are dying of radiation poisoning. If the radiation is intense enough, it looks like a burn. Layers of the skin begin to fall off. The bodies vital function began to slow down until it stops. Continue reading Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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April 2016 – SJ Environmental Justice

picture: watchdog.org
In Greensboro, Georgia, a group of specialists, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), hit a water main while rating a hazardous 19th-century cotton mill site. The sediment sent harmful chemicals down to Lake Oconee and next to the Oconee River. The EPA had actually denied, but later admitted, that it moneyed the clean-up and also development task that triggered the disaster.

Though that accident happened in the earlier months of 2015, heavy rains that come into the Greensboro, GA area simply continue to send more dirt into the creek. Up until this time, the EPA has actually been able to avoid any major criticism for this harmful waste spill, even though it is still reeling from the disaster it produced at a Colorado gold mine.

Lead in the soil at the job site is 20,000 times above federal levels set up for drinking water, claimed microbiologist Dave Lewis, who was a top-level scientist during his 31 years at the EPA. He ended up being a whistleblower, critical of EPA techniques. Now Lewis works for Focus for Health, a non-profit that looks into disease triggers.

The goal of the EPA project was to create low-income housing. A grant was released around 2005 to turn the mill, as well as the surrounding grounds, into housing for the homeless and mentally ill. Professionals dealing with the Georgia Environmental management Division (GEPD) had begun excavating and tearing down the buildings– regardless of objections by the city of Greensboro and not having a solid plan on how to handle the hazardous waste.

The mill site has 34 dangerous chemicals, 30 of which are on the EPA’s checklist of top priority contaminants because of “high toxicity, perseverance, inadequate of degradability, and also damaging effects on living organisms,” Lewis created.

The Mill

The four-acre site contains the deserted Mary Leila Cotton Mill, which created sheeting until the early part of 2000. This hardwood floor structure, which was over 130,000 square feet, was covered in flaky, lead-based paint. This hazardous paint engulfed the grounds, along with ash produced by its coal-burning generators. High degrees of cancer-causing chemicals, such as benzopyrene, are also concealed there. Moreover, neighboring farmers discarded chemicals in the deserted area at a time when arsenic was utilized to kill insects.

Official documents, evaluated by a number of environmental groups, reveal proposals to move the dirt to other areas or cover it with concrete. The government agencies promised to keep track of and repair any potholes or cracks. But according to Lewis, any excavation would certainly send out big amounts of poisonous dirt right into the creek.

In spite of the man-made contaminants, the ground has actually held its own against more degradation. The hazardous soil was mainly constrained to densely-packed reduced levels held in check by a clay barrier. EPA/GEPD contractors destroyed that barrier with a backhoe. According to Lewis, this is what caused pollutants to flow freely.

The EPA hasn’t responded to any requests for comment. The firm has given clashing statements regarding its participation in the project, going from being familiar with absolutely nothing and then finally admitting that it paid for the cleanup and expansion through a grant.

Even Lewis claimed his previous employer (EPA), never ever revealed any kind of concern in a number of responses to his ongoing pleas regarding environmental problems around the old mill. In letters to Lewis and David Kopp, who represented the citizens in their litigation, the EPA downplayed poisoning the Greensboro, GA area creek, pointing to low levels collected in 2010 samples taken.

Lewis says he examined his very own examples at the College of Georgia, where he use to work as a marine biologist. The findings startled him. However, when he informed the EPA, it claimed it wasn’t aware of the situation at the mill.

“There is no government agency involved with any project at the mill property,” EPA Regional Supervisor Heather McTeer Toney wrote Lewis on Jan. 9. Five months later, in a May 28 letter to Lewis, Toney confessed the program was an “EPA brownfields grant-funded job” and that “remediation was needed to be carried out in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.” The state directed the developer to preserve the mill property in a fashion that protects people from exposure to unsafe contaminants, while the property is undergoing corrective action.

The EPA’s site claims brownfields jobs are part of the firm’s requirement in making environmental justice an integral part of every program and policy by applying EPA’s regulatory tools to safeguard at-risk areas.

On March 28, 1979, Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, PA was running at about 100 % power when it immediately turned off after a pump that supplied cooling water quit running. Pressure and temperature level increased in the activator, creating a pressure safety valve to open. The safety valve opened as it was supposed to, and water and steam began draining from the reactor to a tank in the basement of the reactor building.

As the pressure returned to normal, the shutoff valve should have closed. However, unbeknown to the plant operators, the shutoff valve stayed open. It continued to be open for more than two hours, permitting water that covered and cooled the fuel core to leave from the reactor system, causing the fuel to overheat.

Nonetheless, instrumentation in the TMI control room showed to the plant operators that the valve was shut and that too much water was being infused into the reactor vessel. Therefore, plant operators didn’t replace the water that was shed as a result of the open valve.

As the pressure continued to go down, an increasing number of coolant turned to vapor, causing too much vibrating in the main coolant pumps. The vibration made the plant operators at Three Mile Island, who didn’t recognize the reactor was suffering a loss of coolant, to close the pumps.

The reduction of pressure and water caused a big steam bubble to form in the top of the reactor vessel, preventing the flow of cooling water through the core. Without coolant, core temperatures increased above the melting point of the fuel cladding and the uranium fuel.

50% of the fuel melted before the flow of coolant was restored. Likewise, the cold cooling water shattered several of the hot fuel rods. All of the fuel was destroyed. As a result, over 600,000 gallons of radioactive cooling water went into the basement of the reactor building and storage tanks in the auxiliary building, infecting them.

Furthermore, a small amount of radioactive material was launched right into the atmosphere from the ventilation stack of the auxiliary building to ease pressure inside the reactor building.

Health Effects

The TMI accident created no injuries, and at the very least, a dozen epidemiological research studies performed since 1981 have actually found no noticeable direct health effects to impact to the populated area around the plant.

In 2003, a federal court dismissed the case of 2,000 plaintiffs seeking damages from the former plant owners. The court claimed the plaintiffs had actually failed to present evidence they had obtained a radiation dosage big sufficient to cause possible health and wellness effects.

Years of research study and clinical studies have actually shown no unfavorable health issues to the residents around the plant. People that suffered economic losses as a result of the evacuation after the incident were paid quickly, validating the performance of the industry’s obligation insurance coverage protection under the Price-Anderson Act. On top of that, companies were compensated for loss of revenue, and the state and local communities were compensated for costs accrued from responding to the accident.

Safety Measures

Two weeks after the 1979 Three Mile Island accident, President Jimmy Carter assigned a 12-member commission, headed by the late John Kemeny, who was then the president of Dartmouth College, to explore exactly what had taken place and the possible influence it would have on the health and wellness of the public and plant personnel.

The Kemeny Compensation provided a report in October 1979, recommended that the industry creates its own criteria for excellence. The commission also pointed out a need for agency-accredited training institutions for nuclear plant operators and operation supervisors.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also moved promptly, setting up a group to research the accident. Attorney Mitchell Rogovin headed the team, and its conclusions coincided with those of the Kemeny Commission.

In 1979, the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) was due to the failure of equipment and the inability of the plant operators to understand the condition of the nuclear reactors. A slow reduction of cooling water to the reactor’s heat-producing core caused a part of the fuel rod cladding and uranium fuel, as well as the release of a minimal amount of radioactive material.

The TMI accident caused no injuries or fatalities. On top of that, experts wrapped up that the quantity of radiation launched right into the environment was too tiny to result in noticeable direct impacts to the residents living around the plant. At the very least, numerous epidemiological studies have backed up this fact.  Both the industry and the federal government responded swiftly and also emphatically to the accident at Three Mile Island. As for more course of action, the industry formed the Institute of Nuclear Power Workflow (INPO) to ensure excellence in training, plant management, and operations.

April 19, 2016 – SJ Environmental Justice

picture: watchdog.org
In Greensboro, Georgia, a group of specialists, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), hit a water main while rating a hazardous 19th-century cotton mill site. The sediment sent harmful chemicals down to Lake Oconee and next to the Oconee River. The EPA had actually denied, but later admitted, that it moneyed the clean-up and also development task that triggered the disaster.

Though that accident happened in the earlier months of 2015, heavy rains that come into the Greensboro, GA area simply continue to send more dirt into the creek. Up until this time, the EPA has actually been able to avoid any major criticism for this harmful waste spill, even though it is still reeling from the disaster it produced at a Colorado gold mine.

Lead in the soil at the job site is 20,000 times above federal levels set up for drinking water, claimed microbiologist Dave Lewis, who was a top-level scientist during his 31 years at the EPA. He ended up being a whistleblower, critical of EPA techniques. Now Lewis works for Focus for Health, a non-profit that looks into disease triggers.

The goal of the EPA project was to create low-income housing. A grant was released around 2005 to turn the mill, as well as the surrounding grounds, into housing for the homeless and mentally ill. Professionals dealing with the Georgia Environmental management Division (GEPD) had begun excavating and tearing down the buildings– regardless of objections by the city of Greensboro and not having a solid plan on how to handle the hazardous waste.

The mill site has 34 dangerous chemicals, 30 of which are on the EPA’s checklist of top priority contaminants because of “high toxicity, perseverance, inadequate of degradability, and also damaging effects on living organisms,” Lewis created.

The Mill

The four-acre site contains the deserted Mary Leila Cotton Mill, which created sheeting until the early part of 2000. This hardwood floor structure, which was over 130,000 square feet, was covered in flaky, lead-based paint. This hazardous paint engulfed the grounds, along with ash produced by its coal-burning generators. High degrees of cancer-causing chemicals, such as benzopyrene, are also concealed there. Moreover, neighboring farmers discarded chemicals in the deserted area at a time when arsenic was utilized to kill insects.

Official documents, evaluated by a number of environmental groups, reveal proposals to move the dirt to other areas or cover it with concrete. The government agencies promised to keep track of and repair any potholes or cracks. But according to Lewis, any excavation would certainly send out big amounts of poisonous dirt right into the creek.

In spite of the man-made contaminants, the ground has actually held its own against more degradation. The hazardous soil was mainly constrained to densely-packed reduced levels held in check by a clay barrier. EPA/GEPD contractors destroyed that barrier with a backhoe. According to Lewis, this is what caused pollutants to flow freely.

The EPA hasn’t responded to any requests for comment. The firm has given clashing statements regarding its participation in the project, going from being familiar with absolutely nothing and then finally admitting that it paid for the cleanup and expansion through a grant.

Even Lewis claimed his previous employer (EPA), never ever revealed any kind of concern in a number of responses to his ongoing pleas regarding environmental problems around the old mill. In letters to Lewis and David Kopp, who represented the citizens in their litigation, the EPA downplayed poisoning the Greensboro, GA area creek, pointing to low levels collected in 2010 samples taken.

Lewis says he examined his very own examples at the College of Georgia, where he use to work as a marine biologist. The findings startled him. However, when he informed the EPA, it claimed it wasn’t aware of the situation at the mill.

“There is no government agency involved with any project at the mill property,” EPA Regional Supervisor Heather McTeer Toney wrote Lewis on Jan. 9. Five months later, in a May 28 letter to Lewis, Toney confessed the program was an “EPA brownfields grant-funded job” and that “remediation was needed to be carried out in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment.” The state directed the developer to preserve the mill property in a fashion that protects people from exposure to unsafe contaminants, while the property is undergoing corrective action.

The EPA’s site claims brownfields jobs are part of the firm’s requirement in making environmental justice an integral part of every program and policy by applying EPA’s regulatory tools to safeguard at-risk areas.

April 16, 2016 – SJ Environmental Justice

On March 28, 1979, Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, PA was running at about 100 % power when it immediately turned off after a pump that supplied cooling water quit running. Pressure and temperature level increased in the activator, creating a pressure safety valve to open. The safety valve opened as it was supposed to, and water and steam began draining from the reactor to a tank in the basement of the reactor building.

As the pressure returned to normal, the shutoff valve should have closed. However, unbeknown to the plant operators, the shutoff valve stayed open. It continued to be open for more than two hours, permitting water that covered and cooled the fuel core to leave from the reactor system, causing the fuel to overheat.

Nonetheless, instrumentation in the TMI control room showed to the plant operators that the valve was shut and that too much water was being infused into the reactor vessel. Therefore, plant operators didn’t replace the water that was shed as a result of the open valve.

As the pressure continued to go down, an increasing number of coolant turned to vapor, causing too much vibrating in the main coolant pumps. The vibration made the plant operators at Three Mile Island, who didn’t recognize the reactor was suffering a loss of coolant, to close the pumps.

The reduction of pressure and water caused a big steam bubble to form in the top of the reactor vessel, preventing the flow of cooling water through the core. Without coolant, core temperatures increased above the melting point of the fuel cladding and the uranium fuel.

50% of the fuel melted before the flow of coolant was restored. Likewise, the cold cooling water shattered several of the hot fuel rods. All of the fuel was destroyed. As a result, over 600,000 gallons of radioactive cooling water went into the basement of the reactor building and storage tanks in the auxiliary building, infecting them.

Furthermore, a small amount of radioactive material was launched right into the atmosphere from the ventilation stack of the auxiliary building to ease pressure inside the reactor building.

Health Effects

The TMI accident created no injuries, and at the very least, a dozen epidemiological research studies performed since 1981 have actually found no noticeable direct health effects to impact to the populated area around the plant.

In 2003, a federal court dismissed the case of 2,000 plaintiffs seeking damages from the former plant owners. The court claimed the plaintiffs had actually failed to present evidence they had obtained a radiation dosage big sufficient to cause possible health and wellness effects.

Years of research study and clinical studies have actually shown no unfavorable health issues to the residents around the plant. People that suffered economic losses as a result of the evacuation after the incident were paid quickly, validating the performance of the industry’s obligation insurance coverage protection under the Price-Anderson Act. On top of that, companies were compensated for loss of revenue, and the state and local communities were compensated for costs accrued from responding to the accident.

Safety Measures

Two weeks after the 1979 Three Mile Island accident, President Jimmy Carter assigned a 12-member commission, headed by the late John Kemeny, who was then the president of Dartmouth College, to explore exactly what had taken place and the possible influence it would have on the health and wellness of the public and plant personnel.

The Kemeny Compensation provided a report in October 1979, recommended that the industry creates its own criteria for excellence. The commission also pointed out a need for agency-accredited training institutions for nuclear plant operators and operation supervisors.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also moved promptly, setting up a group to research the accident. Attorney Mitchell Rogovin headed the team, and its conclusions coincided with those of the Kemeny Commission.

In 1979, the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) was due to the failure of equipment and the inability of the plant operators to understand the condition of the nuclear reactors. A slow reduction of cooling water to the reactor’s heat-producing core caused a part of the fuel rod cladding and uranium fuel, as well as the release of a minimal amount of radioactive material.

The TMI accident caused no injuries or fatalities. On top of that, experts wrapped up that the quantity of radiation launched right into the environment was too tiny to result in noticeable direct impacts to the residents living around the plant. At the very least, numerous epidemiological studies have backed up this fact.  Both the industry and the federal government responded swiftly and also emphatically to the accident at Three Mile Island. As for more course of action, the industry formed the Institute of Nuclear Power Workflow (INPO) to ensure excellence in training, plant management, and operations.

South Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance

The South Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance (SJEJA) is an environmental justice group with a diverse membership of community activists, scientists, educators, and concerned citizens from Camden city and the SJ region. We believe strongly that everyone is entitled to a safe environment with clean and unpolluted air, water, soil and food. If you share this vision, please help us make it a reality.

For more information, please contact

South Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance (SJEJA)

PO Box 2970
Camden, NJ 08101

email: [email protected]

SJEJA is deeply grateful for the dedicated work of our members, the steady contributions from individuals,

as well as the financial support from the following foundations:

Environmental Endowment for New Jersey
The Ford Foundation
Norman Foundation

Thank you!

EJ Tour of South Camden

Martin Aaron Superfund Site

Scrap Metal Yard next to a Restaurant

Camden’s Farmer’s Market

SJEJA members at national EJ Tour

Science Fair at Forest Hill School

SJEJA

Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection (University of Texas at Austin)
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/
This is a website which puts health, environmental and other social justice issues into a geographical context. Includes Online Maps of Current Interests, such as Avian Flu, Darfur, Hurricane Katrina or the French Riots, as well as Online Maps of General Interests. This site is the gateway to finding information on over 8 million volumes in our collections as well as accessing online maps, images, databases, e-journals, e-books, news sources, and government information. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/

Global Health Atlas (WHO) http://globalatlas.who.int/
The WHO’s Communicable Disease Global Atlas is bringing together for analysis and comparison standardized data and statistics for infectious diseases at country, regional, and global levels. (GIS format)
Choose communicable diseases, human resources, and noncommunicable diseases. http://globalatlas.who.int/

Camden, NJ – Neighborhood Map

Camden, NJ Street Map with Petty Island

i-Map NJDEP is an environmental mapping tools that can provide you with information about your neighborhood, county, or state (NJ). With this easy-to-use application, users can view and query the best of the NJDEP’s Geographic Information System (GIS) data. Homeowners can find out what’s in their backyard; environmental organizations, planners, realtors, and builders can identify open space, various regulatory boundaries, sensitive lands, watersheds, and much, much more. GIS data is accessed in “data layers” in the i-MapNJ DEP application. In the February 2007 release of i-MapNJ DEP, there are over 50 GIS layers.


NJPIRG – Toxic Pollution in NJ

SJEJA – Petty's Island Initiative

Petty’s Island is located in the Delaware north of East Camden

Petty’s Island is an island in the Delaware river off the coast of Camden City (see map), yet it is technically part of Pennsauken. Citgo Petroleum, which owns the island of 390+ acres with a defunct oil terminal and an active shipping firm, wants to give the site to the State of New Jersey. Jack McCrossin, a company spokesperson, said the firm wants to do an environmental clean-up and have the island preserved as a wildlife habitat. But, the New Jersey Natural Lands Trust (McGreevey Administration) blocked the gift (New York Times, 10/2/04) and sided with developers and Pennsauken officials who have unveiled a $1.3 billion plan to put luxury homes and a golf course on the island. (This plan has been scaled down since then. See, “Petty’s Island plan cuts land use in half,” Courier Post, 3/22/07)

Thus, Petty’s Island has been a contested battleground between Pennsauken township and environmentalists, who want it preserved. SJEJA and other environmental groups are advocating the State to take Citgo up on their offer to preserve. A huge array of wildlife was found on the island, including a bald eagle; this lends credence to the argument that this wildlife needs to be preserved, particularly when we have so little open space left in New Jersey. It could become a wonderful destination for school children and eco tourists to learn about South Jersey’s wildlife in its natural habitat. The island could become a environmental refuge for visitors with board walks, nature signs and naturalist’s educating us on the ecosystem we are all part of. Another recreational use would be bicycle and roller skating paths around the island which would give families and nature lovers enjoyment of the outdoors as well as exercise. But, there is another reason why this small island should be preserved for the public.

The Camden City African American Commission uncovered evidence that the island has a rich and diverse history. For example, Petty’s Island had been an early Native American settlement, the location where the German Charitable Society, founded in 1764, held a lottery to raise money for poor German immigrants in 1773, and most importantly, records revealed that the island had been a 17th century slave depot. The Commission argues that Petty’s Island should become a historical landmark in addition to the wildlife refuge and has filed and application for Petty’s Island to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

With the help of Scribe, the Camden City African American Commission produced a documentary about the history of Petty’s Island as part of Scribe’s Precious Places Community History Project.
The 15 min. film is narrated by distinguished actor and social activist, Danny Glover.


Petty’s Island: An Untold History

 

The new documentary, “Petty’s Island: The Untold Story,” was produced by the Camden City African American Commission and the Scribe Video Center in Philadelphia as part of Scribe’s Precious Places Community History Project.

“Petty’s Island” reveals a number of forgotten chapters in this little island’s history. Petty’s Island, now a defunct oil depot owned by Citgo Corporation, had been an early Native American settlement and was used in the 17th century as depot for enslaved Africans.

Although slavery in the North was less prominent, the documentary shows convincingly that slavery existed during the 17th century in Pennsylvania and trading links often had slavery connections. The traders brought their slaves to Petty’s Island instead of Philadelphia to avoid having to pay taxes.

Danny Glover with Mangaliso Davis

 

The film debut took place at the International House in Philadelphia on February 15, 2007 and was shown again at the Walt Whitman Center in Camden on February 20th.
>>> more

Walt Whitman Center for the Arts

V. I. P.s at the Petty’s Island film debut

>>> watch and listen to “All men are created equal” — mpg file, 19 MB, 54 sec. (Real Player)

By LAVINIA DeCASTRO (Courier Post, December 15, 2004)

Camden Community leaders join environmentalists in their fight against development of Petty’s Island in Pennsauken.

During a news conference at Camden’s Pyne Poynt Park, directly across from the densely wooded southern end of the 392-acre island, the activists announced they will file an application this week to have the island listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

SJEJA activists fighting for Petty’s Island

Pennsauken officials have been pushing for a billion-dollar revitalization project on the island. The proposed project includes homes, a hotel and golf course.

“I know that a lot of our opponents have said that Petty’s Island has no historic significance, but we differ on that,” said Mangaliso Davis, a Camden resident and member of the commission.

Members of the African American Commission and South Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance said historic documents show that after the Native Americans who lived there sold the island to European settlers, slavers used it as a trading post.

“They would come here to buy the slaves at an auction and then transport them to Philadelphia,” said Roy Jones, a Camden resident and the alliance’s co-chairman. Holding copies of signs that advertised such auctions, the activists said traders avoided paying taxes by selling their slaves at Petty’s Island instead of Philadelphia.

“This is the first we’ve heard of any historic significance to Petty’s Island,” Pennsauken Mayor Rick Taylor said. “I’d like to see that documented.” Richard Ochab, spokesman for developer Cherokee Pennsauken, said: “Calls to place Petty’s Island on the National Historic Registry are recent and premature.” Ochab said a historical analysis of the site is under way as a standard part of the state Department of Environmental Protection’s permitting process. “Any site worthy of designation will be identified during the NJDEP’s well-established redevelopment and permitting process,” Ochab said.

Sharon Finlayson, chairwoman of the New Jersey Environmental Federation, said environmentalists have collected more than 3,000 signatures in a petition to preserve the island. The island’s owner, CITGO Petroleum Corp., offered to donate Petty’s Island to the state as a nature preserve to protect a pair of nesting bald eagles and other wildlife. But the state’s Natural Lands Trust effectively rejected the offer on Sept. 30. “These eagles are protected,” said Robert Shinn, a representative of the Cooper River Watershed Association. “We’re concerned that of they develop this island, it will chase these eagles away.”

Last month, a U.S. District judge ordered CITGO to allow Cherokee Pennsauken, the township’s redevelopment agent, access to the island to begin environmental surveys preceding either a negotiated sale or condemnation of the island to make way for the project. Davis and Jones said houses built at Petty’s Island would sell for more than $250,000, creating an upscale community within a stone’s throw from one of the nation’s most impoverished cities.

“This would be basically a gated community,” Jones said. “The working class people of Camden and the working class people of Pennsauken will not be able to afford to live on this island. These communities are largely Hispanic and black, so effectively, they’re excluding people of color.”

But Taylor said the plan includes more than just high-end housing. Developers also want to include housing there for senior citizens, low income residents and first time home-buyers, Taylor said. “We don’t even have a final game plan,” Taylor said. “A lot of things must be done before we come up with a final plan, but we truly believe this will be good for the people of Pennsauken and the area.”
>>> read more (Courier Post)

Sierra Club Action Network: SAY NO TO SPRAWL

11/2004. Although the State of New Jersey has refused Citgo’s gift of 392-acre Petty’s Island in the Delaware River, the environmental community hasn’t given up! Citgo is now offering to give a conservation easement on the island to the federal government in partnership with one or more private land trusts for FREE and to clean up ALL contamination to government environmental standards. Citgo is also offering to donate $2 million to a land trust to manage and conserve the island. Taxpayers will not be liable for any environmental clean up costs. Almost 900 responded to our first Petty’s Island alert.
>>> READ THE FULL APPEAL

http://actionnetwork.org/SierraClubNJ/alert-description.tcl?alert_id=2750802

EJ Tour of Camden, NJ – September 29, 2006

South Camden/Waterfront South is a desolate industrial section of Camden City with large numbers of known contaminated sites and many still-active polluting industries. Pockets of remaining residential neighborhoods are mixed throughout this industrial wasteland of at least seven scrap metal recyclers and junkyards, a petroleum coke transfer station, several auto body shops, a paint and varnish company, a chemical company and three food processing plants and the large and dusty G.P. Gypsum plant. Despite strong neighborhood opposition, Camden County has continued to use these neighborhoods as a dumping ground for undesirable and polluting facilities. The erection of the sewage treatment plant was followed by a regional trash-to-steam incinerator, one of the largest in the state, and by a cogeneration power plant in the early 1990s.


Studies show that this environmental injustice has taken a toll:
Residents of these polluted neighborhoods have unusually high rates of respiratory diseases, especially asthma. Camden City residents also have elevated rates of cancer of the lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, kidney, and pancreas. 

Let’s start our online EJ Tour of Camden now:

SOUTH CAMDEN/WATERFRONT SOUTH

PARKSIDE

SOUTH CAMDEN/WATERFRONT SOUTH:

PORT TERMINALS – BECKETT – The South Jersey Port Corporation Terminals in Camden handle almost 3 1/2 million tons of cargo per year. There are approximately 28 businesses leasing property at the two terminals.  Beckett Terminal, nearer the downtown district, has docking facilities that accommodate large vessels for shipments of materials, such as the barges delivering blast furnace slag for the St. Lawrence Cement Company.

ART METALCRAFT PLATING CO., 529 S. 2ND ST. – This electroplating steel and brass operation opened in 1949 and employs approximately 10 people. It uses some hazardous substances, including trivalent chromium, cyanide, zinc, cadmium, and lead into the sewer system. Its air emissions include hydrogen cyanide, soluble nickel and zinc.


STATE METAL INDUSTRIES
, 941 S. 2ND ST. – This aluminum smelter and processor began operations in 1977.  It produces aluminum ingots with various alloys, obtaining the scrap aluminum it uses from area scrap dealers.  The scrap is sorted, passed through a shredder and furnace, and trace metals such as copper, manganese, magnesium, nickel, chromium are added to make the alloy.  The facility emits fine particulates, VOCs, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, metals, PCBs, and ammonia. It also generates some hazardous waste from dust, waste oil, and equipment. It was cited by the DEP in 2002 and in 1992 for exceeding its permitted emission limits. The DEP’s Air Toxic Study modeling results showed that it contributed to high levels of particulates, nickel, and dioxin.


PSE&G
, 2nd AND SPRUCE – This is an electric power generation facility, using liquefied petroleum gas. It also emits air pollutants including fine particulates and VOCs.

CAMCORE – 260 CHESTNUT ST. – This is an aluminum smelting operation which emits fine particulate, chlorine, chromium, metals, ethylene, and toluene.

DURO PLATING, 273 KAIGHN AVE – An electroplating business which emits cadmium and hydrogen cyanide.

CENTRAL METALS, 1054 S. 2ND ST. This is the site of a metal processing company.

GEORGIA PACIFIC GYPSUM CORPORATION, 1101 SO. FRONT ST.  This is a “major facility” which has been in operation since 1962.  It was acquired by Georgia Pacific in 1996.  The facility manufactures various types of gypsum wall board products, gypsum rock, and ground and calcined gypsum.  The facility emits over 85 tons per year of nitrogen oxides, 123.4 tons of sulfur dioxide, almost 4 tons of VOC’s, 12.49 tons per year of carbon dioxide, and 37.33 tons per year of PM-10. Its hazardous air pollutants include arsenic, barium cadmium, chlorine, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, selenium, and formaldehyde. It also uses numerous hazardous substances in its production process, such as VOC’s, portland cement, and acetylene.  In 2002 it was fined for exceeding its allowable particulate emission levels. The DEP’s Air Toxic Study flagged it as a major contributor of particulate pollution, arsenic, cadmium, and lead.

CAMDEN IRON & METAL, FRONT AND ATLANTIC – This company is the largest scrap metal operation in South Camden.  It has two sites along the River, at Pine and at Atlantic. The company crushes and shreds automobile parts and materials and other metals for resale and reuse. Its shredder and frag division alone, on Front and Atlantic Sts, produces 150-170 tons/day, or 35,000 tons/year of automobile shredder fluff. In 1990, DEP discovered that this site was contaminated w/ PCB’s, hydrocarbons, cadmium, and lead.  Although the topsoil was eventually removed, the area remains deed restricted, meaning that it does not meet environmental standards for residential and certain other uses. The operations cause significant air emissions, including fine particulates, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chlorine, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, and VOCs. According to the DEP’s Air Toxic Study, the emissions potentially create unsafe levels of PM 2.5, arsenic, cadmium, lead, nickel in the area near the facility.

PEERLESS CASTING, 250 MECHANIC – An aluminum processor which emits pollutants including fine particulates, chlorine, chromium, metals, and VOCs.

PLASTICS CONSULTING – 1431 FERRY AVENUE – This company does coating and engraving. It emitted large amounts of lead, resulting in potentially unsafe lead levels in the air, but recently has moved its sandblasting operation indoors to reduce emissions. Its other emissions include fine particulates and VOCs.

R. FANELLE’S – FERRY AVENUE – This scrap metal recycler’s two facilities on Ferry Ave. are more examples of the proliferation of scrap recyclers and junkyards in this area.  Automobiles are crushed on site, releasing visible dust emissions.  The company was cited by the DEP for failing to develop a plan to protect against storm runoff and soil and groundwater contamination.

NATIONAL PAPER RECYCLING – 1537 FERRY AVE – The facility recycles cardboard, paper, and plastic brought in by trash trucks. It then ships the materials to New York and oversees where they are made into toilet paper, napkins, and other paper products.

CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL UTILITIES AUTHORITY (CCMUA). This large regional sewage treatment plant treats all of the sewage from 32 of Camden County’s 37 municipalities, serving a population of close to 500,000. The facility cost $850 million.  Ninety miles of pipes and 5 pumping stations deliver the sewage to the facility. The CCMUA treats 58 million gallons of sewage per day, including both household and “pre-treated” industrial waste.  Until recently, the CCMUA operated a sludge composting facility on site, but closed it due to financial considerations.  The sewage treatment plant, and particularly the composting facility, has caused horrific sewage odors in the Waterfront South neighborhood and elsewhere throughout the City for years.  In 1998, a resident group brought a citizen enforcement action against the facility for odor violations, and obtained a settlement through which the CCMUA agreed to do close to $5 million worth of odor control upgrades. Although best known for foul odors, the plant also emits particulate matter, hydrogen sulfide, choloroform, and various VOCs. >>> read more

CONTAINER RECYCLERS, 301 WINSLOW STREET – This company cleans and recycles plastic barrels that stored hazardous substances, mostly paint containers that are cleaned with sodium hydrochloride and painted. Its air emissions consist of VOCs, titanium dioxide and xylene.

WELSBACH/GENERAL GAS MANTLE SUPERFUND SITE, 4TH/JEFFERSON – A manufacturer of gas lantern mantles operated on this site from 1915 to 1940.  The mantles were dipped in thorium, a radioactive material, to make them glow more brightly.  Workers spread the radioactive materials to their homes, and wind blew contaminated soil into neighboring backyards.  After the manufacturing businesses closed down, the site was used as a warehouse.  In 1981, the DEP discovered radioactive hot spots in the area and in neighboring Gloucester City, where a similar facility was located.  No action was taken for eleven years, and warehouse employees continued to be exposed to radon gas and to track the contaminated materials.  In 1991 DEP began its investigation. Extensive soil testing was conducted over a period of several years, and showed the presence of “hot spots” in homes and backyards as well as on the factory site.  DEP finally relocated the warehouse business and one neighboring household in 1992. The site was placed on the National Priority List, and in 1999 the EPA issued a decision that it would remove all contaminated soil. The factory was torn down in 2000.  Eight families continued living on neighboring Arlington St. until the DEP assisted them in relocating in 2002. 239 properties in Waterfront South listed as suspect properties and 17 were listed as potentially contaminated. The site is still awaiting full clean-up.  EPA has spent $65 to 70 million on the section of the site located in Gloucester City, but only $1.5 million in Camden. The EPA has estimated that the increased cancer risk from exposure to the radioactivity for area persons who lived in the area for 30 years is 1.8% (or 1.8 in 100; the EPA considers an “acceptable” risk to be between 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 1,000,000).

AMERICAN MINERALS, JEFFERSON STREET – This facility in the Port area grinds zircon and pyrite shipped to Beckett Terminal and ships the product all over the world. It was one of the most significant sources of fine particulates in South Camden, until it recently upgraded its emission controls.

MCANDREW FORBES (MAFCO), 3RD AND JEFFERSON – This company is a licorice flavoring manufacturer, emitting fine particulates, ammonia, and propylene glycol.


ST. LAWRENCE CEMENT (BROADWAY TERMINAL) – This cement grinding facility annually processes 848,771 tons of blast furnace slag, a byproduct of steel manufacturing, operating 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.    The facility emits 100 tons per year of pollutants, almost 60 tons of which are inhalable particulates, and approximately 30 tons of which is the most dangerous finest size particulates (PM-2.5).  The cement company operations also generated up to 77,000 diesel truck trips per year during its first few years of operation.  The DEP identified it during the Air Toxics Study as a significant contributor to unacceptably high particulate levels in the vicinity of the cement plant. The company is presently seeking modification to its permit to allow it process a higher volume of slag and create larger temporary storage piles.

COGEN POWER PLANT, CHELTON/BROADWAY.  This co-generation power plant emits significant amounts of particulates (47 tons/year), sulfur dioxide (36 tons/year), nitrogen oxides (239 tons/year), carbon monoxide (39 tons/year), hydrocarbons (26 tons/year), ammonia, toluene, and other pollutants.  It was built in the early 1990’s, soon after the incinerator.  

>>> read more

>>> DEP Program for Waterfront South residents to “reduce childhood asthma symptoms and improve the quality of life of asthmatic children.”

HOSPITAL LAUNDRY SERVICE, 2224 BROADWAY – This is a laundry service which adds to air emissions of particulates, metals, and chlorine.

PORT TERMINALBROADWAY –  The Broadway Terminal includes a large industrial area, where various businesses are located. Several of the Port’s occupants, including Alnort Corporation (now closed), Camden Iron and Metal, and Joseph Oats Corporation (company that fabricates containers for nuclear waste storage), have been cited in the past by the DEP for illegal discharges of hazardous substances. A new pier at Broadway Terminal has recently been constructed to allow ships to unload at the Terminal. >>> a different point of view (South Jersey Port Corporation)

AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, 2710 BROADWAY – This company produces and fills liquid nitrogen, oxygen, argon, helium, and carbon dioxide tanks.

INCINERATOR (CAMDEN COUNTY RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITY), 600 MORGAN BLVD –  This trash-to- steam incinerator processes up to 1050 tons per day, or 451,140 tons per year of municipal, bulky, vegetative, and certain types of dry industrial waste. It is allowed to emit over 900 tons/year of nitrogen dioxide, 186 tons/year of carbon monoxide, 213 tons/year of sulfur dioxide, 126 tons/year of cancer-causing hazardous pollutants, including arsenic, hexavalent chromium, and mercury, and 44 tons/year of fine particulates.  Trash is brought to the facility by diesel trucks, with more than 200 deliveries occurring daily. The inhalable particulate readings at the air pollution monitor at the facility are among the highest in the state. >>> read more

COLONIAL PROCESSING, 1930 SO. 6TH ST/VIOLA –  This facility manufactures welding and soldering equipment and does metal coating and engraving.  The process involves chemical cleaning and pickling of steel with sulfuric acid, abrasive cleaning and painting using industrial coatings. Its emissions include fine particulates and VOCs. It has been fined for technical violations regarding storage and labeling of hazardous wastes. The DEP also found during its Air Toxics Study that it potentially caused exceedences of the PM 2.5 standard in the vicinity of the facility.

CLEMENT COVERALL, 619-32 CARL MILLER BLVD – This site was left contaminated when the paint and varnish company that was housed there went bankrupt in 1994.  Some soil was removed in 1990 after a petroleum spill.  Additional clean-up was conducted during a CERCLA action in 1995-96, but the site has not been remediated.  Contaminants in the soil include VOC’s, chromium, and arsenic; naphthalene, lead and chromium was found in the groundwater. The remedial investigation has already cost $274,000+ and an additional $286,000+ has been requested for further analysis.  The total costs of cleanup are unknown.

COMARCO, 501 JACKSON STREET – (above left) Located next door to the Martin Aaron Superfund site, this pork processing company emits fine particulates and lead.


MARTIN AARON SUPERFUND SITE
, 1542 BROADWAY –  This 2.4 acre area was used for the past 30 years by companies which reconditioned drums containing hazardous materials.  The drums were drained and washed with a caustic solution, with runoff collected in basins. Containers leaked onto the ground.  Liquid and solid hazardous waste and up to 1,000 waste containers were illegally buried on the property. The company was repeatedly cited by DEP during the 1980’s and 1990’s for discharges of hazardous substances, but was allowed to continue to operate.  It finally went out of business in 1998. The entire site and the surface groundwater was eventually contaminated with VOCs, PCB’s, arsenic, cadmium, and lead.  The contamination has even spread to adjoining properties.  The building on the property was torn down and the surface soil removed and replaced, but the groundwater contamination is continuing to spread and could eventually affect the water quality in nearby City wells. The EPA has adopted a clean up plan which calls for partial removal of contaminated soil, and capping, with the site being restricted to industrial use.

BROADWAY FINISHING – 1621 BROADWAY – An industrial paint shop, this company emits methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylene.

INNOVATIVE RECOVERY METALS, 1500 SOUTH 6TH AT ATLANTIC  – Another large scrap metal operation, it causes emissions of fine particulates, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc.

SL SURFACE TECHNOLOGIES. 6TH/ATLANTIC – This chromium plating facility has been in operation since the 1940’s.  It plates large feed rollers for corrugated paper industry.  Rollers are degreased, stripped in a hydrochloric acid tank, and sand basted, then plated using chromic acid bath.  An ion-exchange process is used to recover hexavalent chromium from wastewater washing. Its tanks contain 12,000 gallons of liquid hexavalent chromium. Its air emissions include hexavalent chromium, other chromium, metals, and small amounts of particulates. It also generates hazardous waste including 30,000 lbs./year solid chromium waste and corrosive waste from its stripping solution and plating tanks. 

CWS INDUSTRIES, 726 KAIGHN AVE – This electroplating polishing, and anodizing operation uses various hazardous substances including hydrocholoric acid, nickel, sodium cyanide, and lead. During its comprehensive enforcement sweep, the DEP issued 7 major violations to this company for improper handling and storage of hazardous waste and failure to obtain proper licensing as a hazardous waste generator. The total fines were $65,000. Its air emissions include particulates and cadmium.

PARKSIDE:

GREENWAYS TRAILS. A local non-profit is spearheading an effort to protect Camden City waterways and develop a system of parks and access trails that would provide public access to the rivers while preserving them as a natural resource. The trails would link to other greenways trails in other municipalities. Farnham Park in the Parkside neighborhood and the riverfront near Campbell Soup headquarters would be part of that greenways system.

CAMDETT CORPORATION, 1501 PINE ST. – This company was involved in chemical manufacturing, including ammonium polyphosphate which requires use of ammonia. It was located right next to the Camden Early Childhood Development Center, and is also close to residences.  In 2001 the facility emitted 124,000 pounds of air pollutants, making it the second largest air polluter in the county for that year. In 2002 the DEP fined the company $35,000 for emitting ammonia levels approximately 2,000 times the allowable permit limit and emitting nitrogen oxides almost 1,000 times the allowable permit limit.  Ammonia and nitrogen oxides combine to form nitric acid, and with other compounds to form dangerous fine particulates.  Nitric acid and these particulates affect respiratory function, causing damage to lung tissue, aggravation of emphysema, bronchitis, and heart disease, and premature death. Nitrogen oxide also contributes interacts to ozone formation, acid rain, and global warming. The company closed operations in 2005.

MONSANTO SITE.  This vacant area near the River is an abandoned industrial site that has not been remediated.

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT CENTER. This educational facility is part of the Camden public school system and provided head start and early education to pre-school age children. It was closed and slated to be rebuilt as part of the School Construction Corporation project, the largest public works project in New Jersey’s history, with $8.6 billion allocated to build and renovate schools in the state’s poorest educational districts. The SCC quickly ran out of funds after completing only a fraction of the approved projects, raising charges of widespread waste and corruption. The ECDC was one of the five schools in Camden City for which funding was still available. Construction of the new school was stopped, however, when arsenic was discovered in the soil in the area around the school. A plan has been proposed for partial clean up and capping of the site.

LANNING SQUARE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, 5th AND BERKLEY STREETS – This elementary school has been listed as a known contaminated site since 1995. It was closed in 2002 because it was discovered that it was structurally unsound and in imminent danger of collapse. The school was supposed to be rebuilt through the SCC project, but after the SCC ran out of money, there were no funds left to rebuild this school and 33 other Camden City schools that were slated for renovation or replacement. The students at Lanning Square school have been transferred to two other elementary schools, and the site remains unremediated.

>>> download a FACT SHEET of Camden’s Environmental Conditions

>>> watch a Video from the Camden EJ Tour

On the EJ bus in Camden

Roy Jones, SJEJA
(with microphone)

SJEJA leaders and Olga Pomar

– back to top –

>>> back to SJEJA website

>>> to EJ for All website